mymodernmet:

Texas-based photographer Mike Mezeul II’s image of the rare “blood moon” lunar eclipse is simply stunning. The foreground consists of a vibrant field of bluebonnets, contrasting beautifully with the night sky. Shining above the field are images of the phases of the lunar eclipse, showing the moon’s path across the sky throughout the night.


(Source: kinghudson)


abstraire:

Maddie, The Coonhound


nevver:

The start of something, Cody William Smith

(Source: codyslr.com)


awkwardsituationist:

above the clouds, at an altitude between 2,700 and 3,500 metres, with roberto bertero on mount rocciamelone in italy’s susa valley.  said roberto, “a night spent in silence in the mountains at high altitudes, under an infinite starry sky, certainly makes us realize how marvellous it is to be part of something infinitely greater than ourselves.”


(Source: mymodernmet)


infinity-imagined:

Artistic microscope slides produced in the Victorian era (1840~1900) by arranging hundreds of tiny diatoms into intricate patterns.  This was often accomplished by using a single hair to move the diatoms in a special chamber that prevented disturbance to the slide.  The fabrication of these amazing objects must have required incredible patience, attention to detail, and a steady hand.

(Source: victorianmicroscopeslides.com)


artmonia:

OMG who stole my ads?“, a series created by artist Etienne Lavie, who imagine what the streets of Paris could look like if all ads were replaced with masterpieces of classical painting.


itscolossal:

Timelapse Scenes of Swarming Fireflies by Vincent Brady [VIDEO]


queeblo:

dont even talk to me about bob’s burgers’ animation quality

(Source: catrockst3ady)


mymodernmet:

In this striking new series, New Zealand-based artist Henry Hargreaves worked with New York-based stylist Caitlin Levin to create gorgeous maps all made out of food. Originally inspired by a passion for travel, the two decided to take the food each country is best known for—spices for India, tomatoes for Italy, kiwi for New Zealand—and arrange them in a way that’s beautifully pleasant to the eye (and perhaps stomach).